Flu Shot Facts: Should You Get The Shot or Not?

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Have you noticed the public messages by the Center for Disease Control and pharmacy retailers to “get your flu shot” every year?  Is the flu shot worth the risk and how much protection does it offer?    Here are some facts to help you decide:   About 3 out of every 100 people get the flu every year.  Therefore, your chances of getting the flu is only 3 percent. The flu shot prevents the flu in about 1.5 people for every 100 people who get the…

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Several More Strikes Against Flu Shots

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Last month we reported on a Lancet study that found flu shots do NOT work in 98.5 percent of people who receive the shot.  Now, more research is showing flu shots can lead to an increase risk for swine flu, an increased risk of hospitalization and narcolepsy in children, and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease in seniors. Research from Canada and Hong Kong has shown that people who received the seasonal flu vaccine in 2008 had twice the risk of getting the H1N1 “swine…

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What Everyone Should to Know About Flu Shots

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If you have received a flu shot in the past or are considering one this year, there are a few surprising facts about flu shots that may make you reconsider getting one. You may have heard that the flu vaccine is 60 percent effective in preventing the flu but this figure is merely a manipulation of statistics.  The fact is flu shots prevent the flu in only 1.5 people out of every 100 persons who receive the shot!   So how did they come up with…

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Vaccination Theory May Be Incorrect

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The results of a recent study published in the journal Immunity calls into question the vaccination theory. The study found that the body’s immune system, comprised of both innate and adaptive components, work together to ward off disease without the need for antibody-producing vaccines. The theory behind vaccines is that they mimic an infection by triggering B cells, one of the two major types of white blood cells in the immune system, to produce antibodies as part of the “adaptive” immune system. It is widely…

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